During the roasting process the chemical and physical properties of green coffee beans change. Before they turn into the tasty aromatic roasted coffee, their colour, density, their smell and taste alters. The beans increase in size and their colour changes gradually from green through yellow to light, medium and dark brown or black. Each stage of roasting is characterised by a different flavour profile, which can be selected depending on the desired coffee making process and individual taste preference. So if you roast coffee yourself at home, you have more control over the freshness and the flavour profile of the coffee beans. And the choice is wide...

 

coffee_roasting_grades

 

Coffee roasting grades:

 

Green Coffee Beans | 22 °C | Coffee beans as they arrive from coffee farms.

Drying Phase | 165 °C | During the roasting process the beans lose water and increase in size. Weak aroma and a bread smell. No oil on the surface.

Cinnamon Roast | 195 °C | Light Cinnamon is a very light roast, shortly before the first crack. Cinnamon is a light brown roast at the beginning of the first crack. The light brown coffee beans taste as roasted grain with sharp acidic notes, similar to tea.

New England Roast |205 °C | Moderate light brown , still a little sour. Middle to the end of the first crack.

American Roast | 210 °C | Light brown, common in the eastern United States. At the end of the first crack. Origin character is still preserved.

City Roast | 220 °C | Medium brown, common mostly in the USA. Directly after the complete end of the first crack. Good for tasting of coffee beans.

Full City Roast | 225 °C | Medium dark brown with occasional oil sheen on the surface of the beans. At the beginning of the second crack.

Vienna Roast | 230 °C | Dark brown with light surface and clear oil drops, which become increasingly shiny. Bitter-sweet with a slight caramel flavor. It is sometimes used for espresso blends. In the middle of the second crack.

French Roast / Continental Roast / Double Roast | 240 °C | Dark brown with a very shiny and oily bean surface. Little inherent flavors of the coffee remain. Burnt undertone, bitter-sweet flavour and very low acidity. At the end of the second crack. Frequently used for espresso blends.

Italian Roast / Espresso Roast | 245 °C | Very dark brown, very shiny and oily. Burnt bitter tones dominate and the acidity is almost gone. Flat, with thin body. Immediately after the second crack. Often used for espresso blends.

Spanish Roast / Torrefacto Roast | 250 °C | Extremely dark brown, nearly black. The coffee beans shine remarkably.

Torrefacto (in Spanish, roasted) is a special coffee roast with the addition of sugar. Sugar, which is added to the coffee during the coffee roasting, should reduce the acidity and the bitterness of the coffee. This type of coffee roasting is particularly common in Spain. The coffee roasted in this way is mixed with the conventionally roasted coffee (the so-called Tueste Natural). The result is called Mezcla (in Spanish, mix). For example, a 70/30 Mezcla is 70% of Tueste Natural and 30% of Café Torrefacto. Due to the caramelized sugar the unground Torrefacto coffee beans look very dark and shine remarkably. When touching the beans they slightly colour your hands. 

 

 

  During the roasting process the chemical and physical properties of green coffee beans change. Before they turn into the tasty aromatic roasted coffee, their colour, density, their... read more »
Close window

 

During the roasting process the chemical and physical properties of green coffee beans change. Before they turn into the tasty aromatic roasted coffee, their colour, density, their smell and taste alters. The beans increase in size and their colour changes gradually from green through yellow to light, medium and dark brown or black. Each stage of roasting is characterised by a different flavour profile, which can be selected depending on the desired coffee making process and individual taste preference. So if you roast coffee yourself at home, you have more control over the freshness and the flavour profile of the coffee beans. And the choice is wide...

 

coffee_roasting_grades

 

Coffee roasting grades:

 

Green Coffee Beans | 22 °C | Coffee beans as they arrive from coffee farms.

Drying Phase | 165 °C | During the roasting process the beans lose water and increase in size. Weak aroma and a bread smell. No oil on the surface.

Cinnamon Roast | 195 °C | Light Cinnamon is a very light roast, shortly before the first crack. Cinnamon is a light brown roast at the beginning of the first crack. The light brown coffee beans taste as roasted grain with sharp acidic notes, similar to tea.

New England Roast |205 °C | Moderate light brown , still a little sour. Middle to the end of the first crack.

American Roast | 210 °C | Light brown, common in the eastern United States. At the end of the first crack. Origin character is still preserved.

City Roast | 220 °C | Medium brown, common mostly in the USA. Directly after the complete end of the first crack. Good for tasting of coffee beans.

Full City Roast | 225 °C | Medium dark brown with occasional oil sheen on the surface of the beans. At the beginning of the second crack.

Vienna Roast | 230 °C | Dark brown with light surface and clear oil drops, which become increasingly shiny. Bitter-sweet with a slight caramel flavor. It is sometimes used for espresso blends. In the middle of the second crack.

French Roast / Continental Roast / Double Roast | 240 °C | Dark brown with a very shiny and oily bean surface. Little inherent flavors of the coffee remain. Burnt undertone, bitter-sweet flavour and very low acidity. At the end of the second crack. Frequently used for espresso blends.

Italian Roast / Espresso Roast | 245 °C | Very dark brown, very shiny and oily. Burnt bitter tones dominate and the acidity is almost gone. Flat, with thin body. Immediately after the second crack. Often used for espresso blends.

Spanish Roast / Torrefacto Roast | 250 °C | Extremely dark brown, nearly black. The coffee beans shine remarkably.

Torrefacto (in Spanish, roasted) is a special coffee roast with the addition of sugar. Sugar, which is added to the coffee during the coffee roasting, should reduce the acidity and the bitterness of the coffee. This type of coffee roasting is particularly common in Spain. The coffee roasted in this way is mixed with the conventionally roasted coffee (the so-called Tueste Natural). The result is called Mezcla (in Spanish, mix). For example, a 70/30 Mezcla is 70% of Tueste Natural and 30% of Café Torrefacto. Due to the caramelized sugar the unground Torrefacto coffee beans look very dark and shine remarkably. When touching the beans they slightly colour your hands. 

 

 

No results were found for the filter!
Viewed